Monday, July 31, 2017

Bridging the Gap Medical Interpreter Training Registration is now open

Are you or someone you know is interested in a career in healthcare that uses your bilingual and bi-cultural skills? Here is a great training opportunity for you!

For more than 15 years, the Utah Department of Health has trained bilingual and bicultural individuals on how to become effective medical interpreters. We use the Bridging the Gap Medical Interpreter Training, a nationally recognized training course from the Cross Cultural Health Care Program.

Bridging the Gap (BTG) is a 64-hour professional development program that prepares bilingual individuals to work as medical interpreters. BTG is used to train both novice and experienced medical interpreters, and is the first step towards national certification. Both accredited national certifying bodies, the Certification Commission for Healthcare Interpreters (CCHI) and the National Board of Certification for Medical Interpreters (NBCMI), accept BTG.

Space is limited and very competitive. Approved participants MUST attend the entire 64 hours in order to take the final exam and receive a certificate of successful completion. Failure to attend any portion of the course will result in failure of the course. 

Registration opens July 10, 2017
Registration closes July 31, 2017                                                 

Please follow the link below for more specific information on the program and to access the fillable application forms: http://choosehealth.utah.gov/healthcare/continuing-education.php
For more information
Please e-mail Brittany Guerra to be included in the list of prospective participants and to receive additional information about this training.

Brittany Guerra, MPH
Utah Department of Health

Monday, July 17, 2017

Expect The Great College and Career Readiness Fair 2017

The 2017 Expect The Great College and Career Readiness Fair http://admissions.utah.edu/events/expect-the-great.php which will be hosted (for the first time) at Westminster College.  The primary conference dates are: Friday, October 27 (evening session for college student organizations and advisors.) and Saturday, October 28 (roughly 8:00 a.m. thru 4:00 p.m.). 
Dr. Tamara N. Stevenson - Telephone: (801) 832-2454 

Friday, July 14, 2017

13th Annual World Refugee Day

HHS Announces $80.8 Million in Grants for Adult and Family Treatment Drug Courts, and Adult Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts

This week, The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) announces funding of up to $80.8 million over a period of three to five years for treatment drug court programs for people who are involved in the criminal justice system with substance use disorders and co-occurring mental and substance use disorders.

Treatment drug courts combine the sanctioning power of courts with effective treatment services to reduce further criminal justice involvement and promote recovery for people with substance use disorders and co-occurring mental and substance use disorders.  By reducing the health and social costs of substance use disorders for individuals, treatment drug courts improve public safety in communities.

“One of the five key strategies the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has identified for fighting America’s opioid epidemic is expanding access to treatment and recovery services, including the full range of medication-assisted treatments. Drug courts can play an important role in connecting Americans to treatment when they need it,” said HHS Secretary Tom Price, M.D. “As HHS has carried out a national listening tour on the opioid epidemic—one of our top three clinical priorities—we have heard from many Americans finding recovery through drug courts, and we are pleased to support such work.”

“Providing needed treatment services for people with substance use disorders and co-occurring mental and substance use disorders who are involved with the criminal justice system benefits everyone,” said Dr. Kim Johnson, director for the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment.  “Treatment drug courts improve health and recovery outcomes, reduce the burden on the criminal justice system, and help people recover in their communities.”

The grant programs included in this SAMHSA effort are:

Grants to Expand Substance Abuse Treatment Capacity in Adult Treatment Drug Court and Adult Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts

The purpose of this program is to expand and/or enhance substance use disorder treatment services in existing adult problem solving courts, and adult Tribal Healing to Wellness courts, which use the treatment drug court model in order to provide alcohol and drug treatment (including recovery support services, screening, assessment, case management, and program coordination) to defendants/offenders.

Forty-four recipients will receive up to $17.8 million per year for up to three years.

List of grantees

Grants to Expand Substance Abuse Treatment Capacity in Family Treatment Drug Courts

The purpose of this program is to expand and/or enhance substance use disorder treatment services in existing family treatment drug courts, which use the family treatment drug court model in order to provide alcohol and drug treatment (including recovery support services, screening, assessment, case management, and program coordination) to parents with a substance use disorder and/or co-occurring substance use and mental disorders who have had a dependency petition filed against them or are at risk of such filing.

Twenty recipients will receive up to $8.2 million per year for up to five years.

List of grantees

The actual award amounts may vary, depending on the availability of funds.

Information on SAMHSA grants in available at:  http://www.samhsa.gov/grants.

For general information about SAMHSA please visit: http://www.samhsa.gov

Gear Up for World Hepatitis Day on July 28th


Viral Hepatitis Updates from the HHS Office of
HIV/AIDS and Infectious Disease Policy


Gear Up for World Hepatitis Day on July 28th

Viral hepatitis affects more than 400 million people worldwide and has led to more than 1.3 million deaths globally in 2015. In the United States, an estimated 4 million people are chronically infected and more than 21,000 people died of hepatitis B and hepatitis C-related causes in 2015. Driven by the opioid epidemic, we are losing ground in the fight against new viral hepatitis infections; progress on hepatitis B prevention has stalled and some states have seen increases; and new hepatitis C infections have increased almost 300% from 2010 to 2015.

On July 28thWorld Hepatitis Day, join the World Hepatitis Alliance and other international partners to raise awareness, expand testing, improve care & treatment, and make progress towards global viral hepatitis elimination. This year’s theme isEliminate Hepatitis, and a variety of resources are available to get involved and share information with your networks. Learn more and do more by:

RWJF: New funding opportunity

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Woman using a white board. Our nation needs a new generation of bold leaders—innovators who will seek and identify solutions to simple and complex problems that make a difference in the lives of individuals, families, and communities. Nurses must be a part of those leadership efforts.

Help the RWJF Future of Nursing Scholars program develop the next generation of PhD-prepared nurse leaders who are committed to long-term careers that advance science and discovery, strengthen nursing education, and bring transformational change to nursing and health care.

Institutions that offer research-focused PhD programs in nursing are eligible to apply.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Diabetes Study using Virtual Reality seeks participants

Do you have Diabetes? 
Do you want to experience your diabetes related data in Virtual reality?

The University of Utah Department of Biomedical Informatics is looking for people with Type 2 Diabetes to participate in a research study. We will meet with you have you complete some questionnaires and then have you use a tablet computer and a virtual reality system to see/experience how well your blood sugar is under control, how blood sugar varies through the day, and what it might be like to have diabetic eye disease. 

The goal is to see how useful virtual reality is for educating people with Diabetes. We will meet with you, have you complete some questionnaires, and then have you use a tablet computer and a virtual reality system to see/experience how well your blood sugar is under control, how blood sugar varies throughout the day, and what it would be like to have diabetic eye disease.

The study will take 30-45 minutes, participants will be compensated with a $25 gift card.

Eligible participants are: 
  • 18 years old or older and 
  •  Have Type II Diabetes 
  •  but do NOT have diabetic eye disease. 
Please email: Bryan.Gibson@utah.edu or call 801-585-0929 for more information or to schedule an appointment.

Bryan Gibson, DPT, PhD 
Assistant Professor 
Department of Biomedical Informatics 
University of Utah School of Medicine