Wednesday, January 18, 2017

GRANT ANNOUNCEMENTS - Office of Adolescent Health

Office of Adolescent Health FOA: Support for Expectant and Parenting Teens, Women, Fathers, and Their Familieshttps://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/grants/open-grants.html
OAH announces the anticipated availability of funds for states and Tribes to develop and implement programs for expectant and parenting teens, women, fathers, and their families. Funded programs will provide an integrated and seamless network of supportive services to improve health and related educational, social, and economic outcomes – including violence prevention, intervention, and work with pregnant IPV survivors -- in multiple primary settings: high schools, community service centers, and Institutions of Higher Education (IHE). OAH anticipates funding up to 20 grants with an annual budget of up to $1,500,000 for a three-year project period. To learn more, please visit the Open Grants page of the OAH website, or view the announcement on Grants.gov.



Office of Adolescent Health FOA: Centers for Teen Pregnancy Prevention and Adolescent Health Promotion Researchhttps://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/grants/open-grants.html
The Office of Adolescent Health announces the anticipated availability of funds for Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 cooperative agreements for organizations to conduct, synthesize and translate research into practice for the prevention of teen pregnancy and promotion of adolescent health and in support of OAH’s priorities and mission.  Funded organizations are expected to address important and relevant topic areas in pregnancy prevention and adolescent health and to be a national leader in one of five priority areas affecting teen pregnancy.  The priority areas are (1) safe and supportive environments, (2) healthy relationships, (3) meaningful connections to supportive adults, (4) engaging youth and families, and (5) youth in out-of-home care and foster care systems.  Funded organizations are expected to evaluate or assess best practices or evidence-based/evidence-informed approaches in their priority area and make that information easily accessible to providers working with youth to prevent teen pregnancy.
Funded organizations are expected to have a high caliber of scientific and technical competency, be forward-looking, provide strong leadership, and collaborate with stakeholders and community partners including state and local health agencies and non-profit, community (including youth and parents) and non-governmental organizations in the development and delivery of research to practice products.
OAH anticipates funding three cooperative agreements each with an annual budget of up to $500,000.  OAH will fund no more than one cooperative agreement per priority area. Organizations may apply for more than one priority area; however, each application may only address a single priority area.  The three funded organizations will be expected to coordinate and collaborate with each other and OAH.  To learn more, please visit the Open Grants page of our website, or view the announcement on Grants.gov.

Friday, January 13, 2017

Communities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity

Teens tend to a community garden.
Communities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity is the result of a year-long analysis by a 19-member committee of national experts in public health, health care, civil rights, social science, education, research and business. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) commissioned the report as part of a $10 million, five-year grant to NASEM to examine solutions to promote health equity, a key element in a Culture of Health.

Top Takeaways

  • Health equity is crucial to the well-being and vibrancy of communities.
  • Social inequities matter more than health care in shaping health disparities.
  • Health equity holds benefits for the entire nation, from economic vitality to national security.
  • Communities have the power to take steps toward health equity.

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Webinar Series: Engaging Community Health Workers to Reduce Chronic Diseases and Promote Community-Clinical Linkages

Join ASTHO and CDC for a webinar to learn how Prevention Research Centers in Arizona, North Carolina, and New York are engaging community health workers to reduce chronic diseases and health disparities.

This webinar will highlight research and tools for engaging community health workers (CHWs) to prevent chronic diseases, including the University of Arizona's work to create best practices for CHWs in clinical settings. Researchers from the University of North Carolina will also discuss how CHWs, health departments, and primary care clinics are collaborating to reduce cardiovascular diseases in rural communities. Finally, a presenter from the New York University School of Medicine will describe how the center is building on the Million Hearts initiative by integrating CHW and physician support models.

Objectives:
  • Understand how PRC community-based research can be translated into prevention programs.
  • Learn how state health departments can partner with PRCs to improve linkages between clinical care and community preventive health services.
  • Gain ideas for working with CHWs to address chronic diseases and health disparities.
REGISTER here.

Better Diabetes Care Can Decrease Kidney Failure

CDC Vital Signs: Better Diabetes Care Can Decrease Kidney Failure
The latest CDC Vital Signs report finds that diabetes-related kidney failure among Native Americans (American Indians/Alaskan Natives) decreased 54 percent between 1996 and 2013—the fastest decline of any racial/ethnic group in the United States.

Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, a costly condition that requires dialysis or kidney transplant for survival. Kidney failure can be delayed or prevented by controlling blood pressure and blood sugar and by taking medicines that protect the kidneys.

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

JOB TITLE: Community Case Manager

South Valley Services is a non-profit organization whose mission is to provide safe shelter and supportive services to anyone experiencing psychological, physical, emotional, economic or sexual abuse at home. South Valley Services’ programs aim to empower individuals and communities to recognize their self-worth and to develop the necessary skills to reach their greatest potential, contributing to the collective wellbeing of the community.

The Community Resource Centers offer case management and referral services to domestic violence victims and local families using a coordinated community response model across multiple disciplines. The Community Resource Centers’ main offices are located in Riverton and West Jordan and have satellite offices located in various libraries across Salt Lake County to make services more accessible to residents of the community.

CLASSIFICATION
Full‐time Hourly (Non‐exempt, 40 hours per week)

QUALIFICATIONS
  • Ability to pass a background check
  • Bilingual in English and Spanish preferred
  • Knowledge of Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point, and Outlook Programs
  • Valid Driver License, up to date auto insurance, reliable transportation
  • Ability to travel to satellite offices daily from West Jordan
  • Knowledge of community resources
  • Strong public relations skills, ability to speak before large audiences, and able to actively participate in community engagement
  • Ability to work sensitively and effectively with various populations.
EDUCATION/EXPERIENCE
  • Bachelors Degree in human services field or closely related or a current college student
  • Junior or senior year in the field of social work, behavioral science or closely related.
  • A minimum of two years case management experience working in the field of domestic violence and/or experience working with families in crisis
SALARY
$14.25 per hour

REPORTING RELATIONSHIPS
Directly Reports to the Community Resource Center Director

Please send resumes with a cover letter to vickin@svsutah.org

OMH Announces 2 more 2017 Funding Opportunities


Office of Minority Health


FY 2017 Funding Opportunity Announcement

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health (OMH) administers grant programs to support projects that implement innovative models to improve minority health and reduce health disparities.

OMH has released a new funding opportunity announcement (FOA) for which applications are now being accepted. Applications are due by April 3, 2017 at 5:00 pm ET.
Announcement Number: MP-AIA-17-001

Opportunity Title: American Indian/Alaska Native Health Equity Initiative (AI/AN Health Equity Initiative)
Estimated Funding Level: $2 million per budget period
The Office of Minority Health (OMH) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services announces the availability of Fiscal Year 2017 grant funds for the American Indian/Alaska Native Health Equity Initiative (AI/AN Health Equity Initiative). The purpose of the AI/AN Health Equity Initiative is to support tailoring or developing, and implementing, of evidence-based models and/or promising practices to help address trauma (historical and generational) existing in AI/AN communities through innovative programs.

Save the date for a technical assistance webinar for interested applicants on February 8, 2017 at 3:00-4:00 pm ET.
An additional technical assistance webinar on “Evaluation – Review the Basics” will be held onFebruary 23, 2017 at 3:00-4:30 pm ET.


The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health (OMH) administers grant programs to support projects that implement innovative models to improve minority health and reduce health disparities.

OMH has released a new funding opportunity announcement (FOA) for which applications are now being accepted. Applications are due by April 4, 2017 at 5:00 pm ET.
Announcement Number: MP-YEP-17-001


Estimated Funding Level: $3.6 million per budget period

The Office of Minority Health (OMH) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services announces the availability of Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 grant funds for Minority Youth Violence Prevention II (MYVP II): Integrating Social Determinants of Health and Community Policing Approaches. The purpose of the MYVP II program is to build upon lessons learned from MYVP grants originally funded in FY 2014 and to identify innovative approaches to significantly reduce the prevalence and impact of youth violence among racial and ethnic minority and/or disadvantaged at-risk youth.
Save the date for a technical assistance webinar for interested applicants on February 23, 2017 at 5:00-6:00 pm ET.
An additional technical assistance webinar on “Evaluation – Review the Basics” will be held onFebruary 23, 2017 at 3:00-4:30 pm ET.

Friday, January 6, 2017

RWJFs New funding opportunities: Seeking innovators from every field

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Applications are now open for the 2017 cohort in four national leadership development programs designed to create the next generation of leaders committed to equity and better health:
Whether you’re a community advocate, academic researcher, clinician, or simply someone who is passionate about improving the well-being of your community, you are one step closer to finding a leadership development program relevant to your career.
Deadlines are coming up quickly—as early as February 15.