Friday, November 30, 2018

December 7: Improving Dementia Outcomes Among Underserved Populations

Public Health Events


A full-fledged public health response is needed to improve outcomes in communities disproportionately impacted by Alzheimer’s and other dementias. Join the Society for Public Health Education’s webinar on Friday, December 7, 2018, from 12:30 to 1:30 pm ET — Healthy Brain Initiative: Improving Dementia Outcomes for African Americans and Asian American/Pacific Islander Populations. Please register in advance.

The new Healthy Brain Initiative (HBI) State and Local Public Health Partnerships to Address Dementia: The 2018-2023 Road Map has a central goal of reducing disparities among underserved populations. The HBI Road Map’s quick-start guide has 25 actions to promote brain health, increase early detection, enhance safety and quality of care, and support caregivers’ health and effectiveness. Webinar participants will learn about health education and health promotion initiatives that implement Road Map actions and aim to improve outcomes among African Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN).

Presenters include Molly French, Director of Public Health for the Alzheimer’s Association, Dr. Lisa McGuire, Lead of the Alzheimer’s Disease and Healthy Aging Program for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and Marci Getz, Senior Health Educator for the Washington State Department of Health. 

Please be sure to register in advance and mark your calendars for this interactive webinar.

Thursday, November 29, 2018

How long can we expect to live?

Data from the National Vital Statistics System

The CDC National Center for Health Statistics released the Mortality in the United States; 2017 report. 
  • Life expectancy for the U.S. population declined to 78.6 years in 2017.
  • The age-adjusted death rate increased by 0.4% from 728.8 deaths per 100,000 standard population in 2016 to 731.9 in 2017.
  • Age-specific death rates increased from 2016 to 2017 for age groups 25–34, 35–44, and 85 and over, and decreased for the age group 45–54.
  • The 10 leading causes of death in 2017 remained the same as in 2016.
  • The infant mortality rate of 579.3 infant deaths per 100,000 live births in 2017 was not significantly different from the 2016 rate.
  • The 10 leading causes of infant death in 2017 remained the same as in 2016 although 4 causes changed ranks.
This report presents final 2017 U.S. mortality data on deaths and death rates by demographic and medical characteristics. These data provide information on mortality patterns among U.S. residents by variables such as sex, race and ethnicity, and cause of death. Life expectancy estimates, age-specific death rates, age-adjusted death rates by race and ethnicity and sex, 10 leading causes of death, and 10 leading causes of infant death were analyzed by comparing 2017 and 2016 final data(1).
Figure 1. Life expectancy at selected ages, by sex: United States, 2016 and 2017
Figure 1 is a bar graph showing the life expectancy, in years, at select ages, by sex in the United States in 2016 and 2017.

NOTES: Life expectancies for 2016 were revised using updated Medicare data; therefore, figures may differ from those previously published. Access data table for Figure 1
SOURCE: NCHS, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality.

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Privacy and Confidentiality Protections: issues surrounding the Opioid Crisis webinar Nov 29

Thursday, November 29, 1 – 230 MT: Privacy and Confidentiality Protections: Substance Use Disorders and the Opioid Crisis.  The next call from the Region VIII Opioid Misuse Consultation Team will include speakers from the Office for Civil Rights and from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and will focus on HIPAA and 42 CFR as applied to substance use treatment issues.  Pre-registration is not required.

When it's time, join the meeting from here:       

Join the meeting                   

Access Information:   To join the audio portion of the meeting

1. Please call the following number:  WebEx: 1-877-267-1577
2. Follow the instructions you hear on the phone. Your WebEx Meeting Number: 992 545 720

To view this meeting: 

1. Go to https://meetings.cms.gov/orion/joinmeeting.do?MTID=0236d05c02294bf1331b5a83b9ea1aeb
2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
4. Click "Join".
5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

AGENDA (all times mountain)

1:00 – 1:05 pm:  Welcome and housekeeping  (Christina Mead or Charlie Smith)

1:05 – 1:30 pm:  HIPAA PRIVACY RULE: OCR will provide an overview of how the HIPAA Privacy Rule protects information regarding substance use and abuse and how it allows for information sharing that is necessary to aid in treatment.  Specifically, OCR will discuss the access provisions of the Privacy Rule, as well as OCR’s guidance related to opioid overdose and sharing information related to mental health.

  • Speaker:  Emily Prehm, J.D., Equal Opportunity Specialist, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights, Rocky Mountain Region. Emily Prehm is an Equal Opportunity Specialist with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights (OCR), Rocky Mountain Region in Denver, Colorado.  She began working with OCR in 2002 as a Legal Intern.  Emily received a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder and is licensed to practice law in the state of Colorado.


1:30-1:55 pm:  42 CFR Part 2: Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder Patient Records is a Federal law that protects and ensures the rights of patients receiving treatment for a Substance Use Disorder (SUD) so that they do not face adverse consequences as a result of their SUD treatment such as arrest, child custody, divorce or employment proceedings. This presentation will briefly review the components of 42 CFR Part 2 and considerations relative to community and provider responses to the opioid epidemic.

  • Speaker: Charles H. Smith, Ph.D., Regional Administrator, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – Region VIII (Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming). Dr. Smith is the Regional Administrator for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - Region VIII.  Dr. Smith is the former Director of the Colorado Division of Behavioral Health and Deputy Commissioner of Mental Health and Substance Abuse for the State of Colorado.  Dr. Smith is a Licensed Psychologist with over 25 years of experience in fields of forensic psychology, addictions, suicide prevention, crisis intervention, behavioral health policy and administration. 

1:55-2:15 pm: State and Federal Leadership comments and announcements
2:15-2:30 pm: Discussion and Q&A
2:30 pm: Adjourn

SAMHSA FOA/Grant Opportunity Announcements

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) released the following funding opportunity announcements (FOA).  Below is information on the FOA’s as well as the link for additional information. Please share it with your colleagues and tribal stakeholders.
 
  • Short Title:  Healthy Transitions
  • FOA Number: SM-19-001
  • Application Due Date: Friday, December 21, 2018
  • Purpose:  The purpose of this program is to improve access to treatment and support services for youth and young adults, ages 16-25, who have a serious emotional disturbance or a serious mental illness, hereafter referred to as serious mental disorders.
  • Eligibility:  Federally recognized (as defined in Section 4[b] and Section 4[c] of the Indian Self-Determination Act) American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribes, tribal organizations and consortia of tribes or tribal organizations.  Note: Recipients who received funding under SM-18-010 Healthy Transitions are not eligible to apply for funding under this FOA. Recipients who received funding under SM-14-017 Now is the Time: Healthy Transitions are eligible to apply for funding under this FOA but must select two different communities with whom to partner with.  
  • Anticipated Total Available Funding:  $14,130,226
  • Anticipated Number of Awards: Up to 14 (At least 3 awards will be made to tribes/tribal organizations pending sufficient application volume from these groups).
  • Anticipated Award Amount:  $1,000,000 per year
  • Length of Project:  Up to 5 years
  • Cost Sharing/Match Required?:  No
 
  • Short Title:  SCN
  • FOA Number: SM-19-002
  • Application Due Date: Monday, December 24, 2018
  • Purpose:  The purpose of this program is to improve efforts to address the needs of adults with serious mental illness (SMI) by developing and/or expanding peer support services, peer leadership, and peer engagement strategies statewide.
  • Eligibility:  Eligibility is limited to domestic public and private non-profit entities, tribes, and Urban Indian organizations that are mental health consumer-operated organizations for at least two years and are not operating under the umbrella of another organization. Note:  Recipients in states, tribes, or territories who received Statewide Consumer Network funding under SM-16-002 or SM-18-008 are not eligible to apply.
  • Anticipated Total Available Funding:  $883,876
  • Anticipated Number of Awards: 9
  • Anticipated Award Amount:  Up to $95,000 per year
  • Length of Project:  Up to 3 years
  • Cost Sharing/Match Required?:  No
 
  • Short Title:  AWARE-SEA
  • FOA Number: SM-19-003
  • Application Due Date: Monday, December 24, 2018
  • Purpose:  The purpose of this program is to build or expand the capacity of State Educational Agencies, in partnership with State Mental Health Agencies overseeing school-aged youth and local education agencies. 
  • Eligibility:  Education Agencies/Authorities serving children and youth residing in federally recognized American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribes, tribal organizations, and consortia of tribes or tribal organizations.
  • Anticipated Total Available Funding:  $15,206,308
  • Anticipated Number of Awards: 8 (At least 2 awards will be made to Tribal Education Agencies/Authorities pending sufficient application volume from these groups).
  • Anticipated Award Amount:  $1,800,000 per year
  • Length of Project:  Up to 5 years
  • Cost Sharing/Match Required?:  No
 
  • Short Title:  SFN
  • FOA Number: SM-19-004
  • Application Due Date: Friday, January 4, 2018
  • Purpose:  The purpose of this program is to better respond to the needs of children and adolescents with serious emotional disturbance and their families by providing information, referrals, and support; and to create a mechanism for families to participate in state and local mental health services planning and policy development.
  • Eligibility:  Eligibility is limited to family-controlled domestic public and private non-profit organizations in states, territories, and tribes. Note:  Recipients in states and territories who received SFN funding under SM-18-007 are not eligible to apply. 
  • Anticipated Total Available Funding:  $1,448,985
  • Anticipated Number of Awards: 15 (At least 3 awards to family controlled organizations in tribes pending sufficient application volume from these groups). 
  • Anticipated Award Amount:  Up to $95,000 per year
  • Length of Project:  Up to 3 years
  • Cost Sharing/Match Required?:  No
 
  • Short Title:  Native Connections
  • FOA Number: SM-19-005
  • Application Due Date: Friday, January 4, 2019
  • Purpose:  The purpose of this program is to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance use, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote mental health among American Indian/Alaska Native youth through the age of 24 years. 
  • Eligibility:  Eligibility is limited to federally recognized American Indian/Alaska Native tribes, tribal organizations, Urban Indian Organizations, or consortia of tribes and tribal organizations.
  • Anticipated Total Available Funding:  $12,797,090 (CMHS - $8,476,531; CSAP - $4,320,559)
  • Anticipated Number of Awards: 51
  • Anticipated Award Amount:  Up to $250,000 per year
  • Length of Project:  Up to 5 years
  • Cost Sharing/Match Required?:  No
 
  • Short Title:  Family Treatment Drug Courts (FTDC)
  • FOA Number: TI-19-001
  • Application Due Date: Friday, January 4, 2019
  • Purpose:  The purpose of this grant program is to expand substance use disorder (SUD) treatment services in existing family treatment drug courts, which use the family treatment drug court model in order to provide alcohol and drug treatment to parents with an SUD and/or co-occurring SUD and mental health disorder who have had a dependency petition filed against them or are at risk of such filing.
  • Eligibility:  Eligibility is limited to federally recognized American Indian/Alaska Native tribes, tribal organizations, Urban Indian Organizations, or consortia of tribes and tribal organizations.  Note:  Family treatment drug courts that received an award under TI-17-004 (FY 2017 Grants to Expand Substance Abuse Treatment Capacity in Family Treatment Drug Courts) and TI-18-002 (FY 2018 Grants to Expand Substance Abuse Treatment Capacity in Family Treatment Drug Courts) are not eligible to apply for this funding opportunity.
  • Anticipated Total Available Funding:  $10,625,000
  • Anticipated Number of Awards: 25 (At least 5 awards will made to tribes/tribal organizations pending sufficient application volume from these groups).
  • Anticipated Award Amount:  Up to $425,000 per year
  • Length of Project:  Up to 5 years
  • Cost Sharing/Match Required?:  No
 
  • Short Title:  SAMHSA Treatment Drug Courts (FTDC)
  • FOA Number: TI-19-002
  • Application Due Date: Friday, January 4, 2019
  • Purpose:  The purpose of this program is to expand substance use disorder (SUD) treatment services in existing adult problem solving courts, and adult Tribal Healing to Wellness courts, which use the treatment drug court model in order to provide SUD treatment (including recovery support services, screening, assessment, case management, and program coordination) to defendants/offenders.
  • Eligibility:  Eligibility is limited to federally recognized American Indian/Alaska Native tribes, tribal organizations, Urban Indian Organizations, or consortia of tribes and tribal organizations. Note:  ATDCs and Adult Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts funded in FY2017 under announcement TI-17-001 and FY 2018 under announcement TI-18-008 are not eligible to apply for this program.
  • Anticipated Total Available Funding:  $10,000,000
  • Anticipated Number of Awards: 25 (At least 5 awards will made to tribes/tribal organizations pending sufficient application volume from these groups).
  • Anticipated Award Amount:  Up to $400,000 per year
  • Length of Project:  Up to 5 years
  • Cost Sharing/Match Required?:  No

Monday, November 26, 2018

HRSA-led study estimates 1 in 40 U.S. children has diagnosed autism


U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesContact:HRSA Press Office
301-443-376
press@hrsa.gov
www.hhs.gov/news
Twitter @SpoxHHS
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, November 26, 2018
 
 HRSA-led study estimates 1 in 40 U.S. children has diagnosed autism
 
A new study led by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) found that about 1.5 million U.S. children — or 1 in 40 — have received a diagnosis of, and currently have, autism spectrum disorder. Published in Pediatrics, the analysis used data collected from parents of more than 50,000 children from the 2016 HRSA National Survey of Children's Health. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Harvard University, Drexel University, and George Washington University contributed to the study.

Previous research has shown that autism diagnoses have increased in children over the past 20 years.

"Through the National Survey of Children's Health, our study provides the most recent nationally representative data on both the prevalence of autism and some of the challenges families face obtaining care," said lead author Michael D. Kogan, Ph.D., of HRSA's Maternal and Child Health Bureau. "This new information improves our capacity to understand and address autism, a complex neurological disorder."

The authors examined data on children aged 3-17 years. In addition to the new information on prevalence, they found that over a quarter of children with autism were taking medication for symptoms, and nearly two-thirds received behavioral treatments in the last 12 months. Parents reported that their children with autism were significantly less likely to get needed mental health care compared to children with other emotional, behavioral, or developmental conditions.

Funded and led by HRSA, the National Survey of Children’s Health produces national and state data every year from thousands of voluntary interview responses collected from parents. It provides one of the largest samples of child health representing all of the United States.

"The findings from this study help us better understand the characteristics and complexities of autism," said Stuart Shapira, M.D., Associate Director for Science at CDC's National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. "This information can help lead to better access to early intervention services and support for children with autism and their families."

The HRSA National Survey of Children's Health released 2017 data in October 2018. To learn more, visit https://mchb.hrsa.gov/data/national-surveys.

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

The Opioid Crisis Symposium

The S.J. Quinney College of Law

Utah Law Review Symposium
The Opioid Crisis: Paths Forward to Mitigate Regulatory Failure

Friday, November 30, 2018

8:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., S.J. Quinney College of Law, Level 6
The 2018-2019 Utah Law Review presents “The Opioid Crisis: Paths Forward to Mitigate Regulatory Failure.” The symposium will critically examine failures of the pharmaceutical market, subsequent inadequate regulatory responses, and possible solutions as the nation moves forward in addressing the crisis. Scholars from around the country will discuss the impact of regulation from the national and state level, the impact of addiction on communities, and how public health research should inform future policy and regulation decisions. Read more »
5 hours of CLE (pending). Lunch provided. Free and open to the public but registration is requested.

Panel discussions include:

  • U.S. Food and Drug Administration
  • The Public Health Perspective: Tracing the Root of the Problem
  • The Role of States in Regulation
  • The Community Impact of the Opioid Crisis: Addiction, Criminal Justice, and Health Disparities
Free parking is available at the Rice-Eccles Stadium. We encourage you to use public transportation to our events. Take TRAX University line to the Stadium stop and walk a half block north.

SOAR online training modules now available in Spanish


SOAR Online is a new series of CE/CME training modules that you can complete whenever, wherever you like. Each module discusses the SOAR framework and how to apply it where you work to identify individuals who are at risk of trafficking or who have been trafficked—and connect them with the resources they need.
The three training modules available now in Spanish include:

SOAR to Health and Wellness
Trauma-Informed Care
Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services

The SOAR framework explained:

By applying a public health approach, SOAR seeks to build the capacity of communities to identify and respond to the complex needs of individuals who have been trafficked and understand the root causes that make individuals, families, and communities at risk of trafficking.
Stop—Describe the scope of human trafficking in the United States.
Observe—Recognize the verbal and nonverbal indicators of human trafficking.
Ask—Identify and interact with individuals who have been trafficked using a victim-centered and trauma-informed approach.
Respond—Respond effectively to potential human trafficking in your community by identifying needs and available resources to provide critical support and assistance.
Find SOAR Online at https://www.acf.hhs.gov/otip/training/soar-to-health-and-wellness-training/soar-online

Monday, November 19, 2018

Mayor Ben McAdams Native American Proclamation

Please join the Council of Diversity Affairs, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and other offices within the Salt Lake County Government in listening to Mayor McAdams read the Native American Proclamation, which solidified November as National Native American Heritage Month.
When: Tuesday, November 20th, 2018
Where: County Council Chambers
Salt Lake County Government Complex,
2001 South State Street
North Building, First floor
Time
: 4:00pm

Friday, November 16, 2018

Largest Dementia Prevalence Increase Projected Among Minority Groups










Between 2014 and 2060, minority racial and ethnic populations — including Hispanics, Asians and Pacific Islanders, American Indians and Alaska Natives, and African Americans — are projected to have large increases in Alzheimer’s and other dementias prevalence, according to a new analysis from the CDC published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia. Overall prevalence of dementia is projected to rise from 1.9 percent of the United States population aged 65 years or older (in 2014) to 3.3 percent of that population by 2060.

Researchers used U.S. Census Bureau and Medicare fee-for-service data to estimate the number of people with Alzheimer’s by age, sex, race, and ethnicity in 2014 and 2060. During that timeframe, the projected percentage increases in prevalence of Alzheimer’s and other dementias are:

644 percent among Hispanics
520 percent among Asian and Pacific Islanders
477 percent among American Indian and Alaska Natives
279 percent among African Americans
90 percent among whites

The analysts indicate these prevalence increases are expected as a result of fewer people dying from other chronic diseases and surviving into older adulthood when the risk for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias rises. With an enhanced emphasis on promoting health equity, the HBI Road Map recommends using surveillance data like these to prioritize systemic disparities that may differentially impact minority and underserved populations. Learn more about data and needs assessments on alz.org/publichealth.

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

New Medicare Card Mailing – Wave 6 Ends

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and The Medicare Learning Network
CMS finished mailing cards to people with Medicare who live in Waves 1-5 and now Wave 6 states (Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming). Card mailing in Wave 7 states and territories continues.
If someone with Medicare says they did not get a card, you should instruct them to:
  • Sign into MyMedicare.gov to see if we mailed their card. If so, they can print an official card. They will need to create an account if they do not already have one.
  • Call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) where we can verify their identity, check their address, and help them get their new card.
You can print out and give them a copy of Still Waiting for Your New Card?, or you can order copies to hand out. Continue to direct people with Medicare to Medicare.gov/NewCard for information about the mailings and to sign up to get an email about the status of card mailings in their state.
To ensure that people with Medicare continue to get care, health care providers and suppliers can use either the former Social Security number-based Health Insurance Claim Number or the new alpha-numeric Medicare Beneficiary Identifier for all Medicare transactions through December 31, 2019.
People with Medicare should continue to protect their new number to prevent medical identity theft and health care fraud, especially during Medicare Open Enrollment. You can find fraud prevention resources on our Medicare card Outreach & Education page to share with people with Medicare.

FEDERAL GRANT APPLICATIONS CDBG Hard Costs & Community & Support Services

NOTICE OF 2019-2020 FEDERAL GRANT APPLICATIONS
CDBG Hard Costs & Community & Support Services

WHAT:          Salt Lake Urban County is Releasing the RFA for the 2019-2020 Community and Support Services (SSBG, ESG and CDBG Public Services) and the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Hard Cost Programs.

WHEN:          Applications will be available beginning Thursday, November 8, 2018

WHERE:       The Applications will be accepted through ZoomGrantsTM the online grant management system. 

                        A Federal Grant Application Handbook will be available on the County website at www.slco.org/hcd to assist applicants through the process, as well as the link to ZoomGrantsTM for the applications

The Salt Lake County Division of Housing and Community Development (HCD) is releasing the RFA for Community & Support Services and CDBG Hard Cost Programs, on or about Thursday, November 8, 2018.  These funds include CDBG & ESG funding through the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development and SSBG funds through the State of Utah.

Applications will only be accepted through ZoomGrantsTM, the County’s online grant management system.

A Mandatory Training has been scheduled for these programs.

November 13, 2018                     9:00 am – 11:00 am                   CDBG “Hard Cost Projects”
November 13, 2018                     3:00 pm – 5:00 pm                     CDBG “Hard Cost Projects”

November 13, 2018                     11:30 pm – 2:30 pm                    Community & Support Services
November 16, 2018                     1:00 pm – 4:00 pm                     Community & Support Services

Agencies need to attend only ONE training for each type of application they plan to submit.  Both Program and Fiscal staff should attend.  More information can be found on the County Website at www.slco.org/hcd .   You can also contact Karen Kuipers at kkuipers@slco.org or Amanda Cordova at alcordove@slco.org for additional information.

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, reasonable accommodations (including auxiliary communicative aids and services or alternate formats) for individuals with disabilities may be provided upon receipt of a request with five working days’ notice. To expedite accommodation requests and coordination, call 385-468-4900 or 385-468-4893.  TTY user’s: 711

Completed applications must be submitted via ZoomGrantsTM by 5:00 pm MST on
Friday, December 21st, 2018

Hard copy applications or late applications will not be accepted


-slco-
November 1, 2018
Contact:  Karen Wiley
385-468-4870
TTY - 711

Monday, November 12, 2018

Privacy and Confidentiality Protections: Substance Use Disorders and the Opioid Crisis

Thursday, November 29, 1 – 2:30 MT: Privacy and Confidentiality Protections: Substance Use Disorders and the Opioid Crisis.  The next call from the Region VIII Opioid Misuse Consultation Team will include speakers from the Office for Civil Rights and from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and will focus on HIPAA and 42 CFR as applied to substance use treatment issues.  Pre-registration is not required.

When it's time, join the meeting from here:       
         
Access Information:   To join the audio portion of the meeting

1. Please call the following number:     WebEx: 1-877-267-1577
2. Follow the instructions you hear on the phone. Your WebEx Meeting Number: 992 545 720

-------------------------------------------------------
To view this meeting:

1. Go to https://meetings.cms.gov/orion/joinmeeting.doMTID=0236d05c02294bf1331b5a83b9ea1aeb
2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
4. Click "Join".
5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

AGENDA (all times mountain)

1:00 – 1:05 pm:  Welcome and housekeeping  (Christina Mead or Charlie Smith)

1:05 – 1:30 pm:  HIPAA PRIVACY RULE: OCR will provide an overview of how the HIPAA Privacy Rule protects information regarding substance use and abuse and how it allows for information sharing that is necessary to aid in treatment.  Specifically, OCR will discuss the access provisions of the Privacy Rule, as well as OCR’s guidance related to opioid overdose and sharing information related to mental health.

SpeakerEmily Prehm, J.D., Equal Opportunity Specialist, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights, Rocky Mountain Region.
Emily Prehm is an Equal Opportunity Specialist with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights (OCR), Rocky Mountain Region in Denver, Colorado.  She began working with OCR in 2002 as a Legal Intern.  Emily received a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder and is licensed to practice law in the state of Colorado.

1:30-1:55 pm:  42 CFR Part 2: Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder Patient Records is a Federal law that protects and ensures the rights of patients receiving treatment for a Substance Use Disorder (SUD) so that they do not face adverse consequences as a result of their SUD treatment such as arrest, child custody, divorce or employment proceedings. This presentation will briefly review the components of 42 CFR Part 2 and considerations relative to community and provider responses to the opioid epidemic.

Speaker: Charles H. Smith, Ph.D., Regional Administrator Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – Region VIII
(Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming). Dr. Smith is the Regional Administrator for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - Region VIII.  Dr. Smith is the former Director of the Colorado Division of Behavioral Health and Deputy Commissioner of Mental Health and Substance Abuse for the State of Colorado.  Dr. Smith is a Licensed Psychologist with over 25 years of experience in fields of forensic psychology, addictions, suicide prevention, crisis intervention, behavioral health policy and administration.

1:55-2:05 pm: Discussion and Q&A

2:05-2:30 pm: State and Federal Leadership comments and announcements

2:30 pm: Adjourn

Thursday, November 8, 2018

November is Native American Heritage Month

National Native American Heritage Month 2018
Resources
Association of American Medical Colleges and the Association of American Indian Physicians: New report. Reshaping the Journey: American Indians and Alaska Natives in Medicine. This report illustrates the case for increasing AI/AN representation in health professions by highlighting the value of diversity in education and training, and workforce needs. It summarizes effective, promising practices and programs at many of the nation's medical schools that have contributed to the development of Native physicians and allies who are trained to address the health care needs of AI/AN communities. 
Learn more | Download the full report (PDF).

Using Our Wit and Wisdom to Live Well with Diabetes is an autobiography of a Native American woman describing her experience of living with and managing diabetes. Published by the Indian Health Service, the book shares numerous personal stories of how her diagnosis impacted the author’s everyday life, ways the culture and traditions of her tribe helped her to become comfortable with the diagnosis, and changes she made to improve her health. Find a copy of chapter one here.

Monday, November 5, 2018

UDOH Job Posting- EPICC Program Coordinator- Health Systems

Department of Health has a recruitment open for the following position:

Environment, Policy and Improved Clinical Care Program Coordinator
$23.89-$35.90

This is a full-time, career service position with benefits.
Requisition #   17514
Closes:   11/13/2018 at 11:59 pm MST 

In order to be considered for an interview for these positions, you will need to apply on-line at https://statejobs.utah.gov.  If you have not done so already, you will need to create a job seeker account.