Monday, August 26, 2013

CDC's 2012 School Health Policies and Practices Study (SHPPS) Results Released

Today, the Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH) released the 2012 School Health Policies and Practices Study (SHPPS) results on the SHPPS web site at www.cdc.gov/shpps.


The release includes:
  • a comprehensive report that includes results on the following topics:
    • health education
    • physical education and physical activity
    • health services
    • mental health and social services
    • nutrition services and the school nutrition environment
    • safe and healthy school environment
    • physical school environment
    • faculty and staff health promotion
  • a fact sheet highlighting key 2012 results
  • a fact sheet highlighting trends over time (2000-2012)
  • all questionnaires
  • public-use datasets and technical documentation
SHPPS Background:  
SHPPS is a national study periodically conducted to assess school health policies and practices at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. SHPPS was conducted at each of these levels in 1994, 2000, and 2006. In 2012, SHPPS was conducted at the state and district levels. School- and classroom-level data collection will take place in 2014.

For more information about SHPPS:
Among other findings: 
  • The percentage of school districts that allowed soft drink companies to advertise soft drinks on school grounds decreased from 46.6 percent in 2006 to 33.5 percent in 2012.
  • The percentage of districts that required schools to prohibit offering junk food in vending machines increased from 29.8 percent in 2006 to 43.4 percent in 2012.
  • The percentage of districts that made information available to families on the nutrition and caloric content of foods available to students increased from 35.3 percent in 2000 to 52.7 percent in 2012.
  • The percentage of school districts that required elementary schools to teach physical education increased from 82.6 percent in 2000 to 93.6 percent in 2012. (RWJF)

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